Cricket Helmets

Cricket Helmets

Cricket helmets have become one the most important parts of any cricketers kit bag.

Cricket is an age old game and so it’s hard to imagine how for so many years this essential piece of cricket equipment simply didn’t exist. As someone that played cricket at school during the 1980’s I never used a cricket helmet and yet with a son that’s now 14, I would never let him bat without one.

In recent years the whole manufacturing and more importantly the design process of cricket helmets has undergone a complete transformation.

Whilst many leading brands had a range of batting cricket helmets on the market, it was becoming apparent that the designs available were fundamentally flawed and the batsmen was still exposed to unacceptable levels of risk and harm from fast paced deliveries and even miscued shots off the bat. Extensive tests were done and new standards set.

As a result of these new standards, all the big name brands had to stop making cricket helmets and were instead sent back to the drawing board to completely redesign every aspect of the helmets construction, shape, manufacturing process and performance levels. Once redesigned, each manufacturer was asked to submit the prototype’s to the testing laboratory, where each helmet was put through the paces. Those that passed the tests were brought to market, those that didn’t had to correct those shortcomings, as there was to be no shortcut solution.

Whether it was…Masuri, Gray Nicolls, Gunn and Moore, Kookaburra, Shrey, Ayrtek, or Albion, each brand had to prove its worth in order to come back into the marketplace and supply cricket helmets.

Strangely it was two of the non-specialist cricket helmet brands, GM and Gray Nicolls that were amongst the first to release an approved cricket helmet to the marketplace. Needless to say sales went through the roof and we simply couldn’t get enough. Word soon spread to cricketers that a safe and fully approved helmet was now available. So common sense prevailed and the customers came out in droves to purchase one of the new approved cricket helmets.

What everyone was really waiting for though, was the Masuri cricket helmet range and once it was released everyone saw that it was certainly worth the wait. The Masuri cricket helmet range was revolutionary. First of all it was to be manufactured in the UK, something no other brand had ever done before.

Masuri went all out to produce a cricket helmet that was extremely advanced in terms of technology and therefore in terms of safety too.

The Halo system ensured an extremely rigid and safe peak area to the helmet, which was a big criticism of various brands before the approval process. Masuri also released two versions in the Elite and Test series and they soon became the preferred choice for most international batsmen around the world.

Shrey cricket helmets also came into the marketplace. As a former manufacturers of the Masuri helmets, rather than lose all their business with the decision of Masuri to manufacture in England, they decided to bring out a new helmet and offering and this move proved to be a great success.

As we come into the new season the Masuri range has expanded even more with both lower priced and medium priced models entering the fray. The range has improved in terms of quality and finish and with the Original Series MKII, we have Masuri tradition with the latest safety standards.

Gray Nicolls continue with their best selling Atomic and Test Opener models which are built perfectly and offer fantastic value for money. The Gray Nicolls helmets are known for thier comfort as well as all round protection. A firm favourite amongst our junior customers who love the abundance of padding that makes them amongst the most comfortable on the market.

GM continue with the Geo and Purist models and Kookaburra offer some fantastic helmets great prices in the 800 and 400 models.

As one of the most important pieces of anyone’s kit bag the cricket helmet has finally been given the safety features it needed. As a compulsory piece of kit for all juniors, there is now a bigger choice than ever to all cricketers. With prices starting from under £40 for a full approved model, its no longer an expensive luxury and with all the leading brands now introducing affordable stemguards into thier ranges, all round protection is available to all ages.

Kookaburra Ghost Pro Batting Gloves

kookaburra ghost pro batting gloves
The new Kookaburra Ghost Pro Batting Gloves

The Kookaburra Ghost  was one of the best selling cricket bats for most retailers last year. Therefore, it was no surprise then to see Kookaburra expand the whole Ghost range quite substantially.

Keeping with the white and silver colour scheme from the original range, the new additions look really classy and manage to show off the product to great effect.

At the top of the range is the Kookaburra Ghost Pro batting gloves. A sausage style glove, the Ghost Pro offers top levels of protection to the batsmen and thanks to the top quality materials used by Kookaburra, the glove offers excellent protection and comfort too.

It’s commonly known that sausage style batting gloves offer very good levels of protection, but it’s also known that due to the sausage style design with no precut fingers, this style of glove takes longer to break in too.

The Kookaburra Ghost Pro Batting Gloves work well and offers the flexibility batsmen need.

As for sizes, they are available in both small men’s and standard men’s sizes.

Kookaburra Ghost Pro Batting Gloves

Aero Strippers, Batting Gloves, Batting Pads and some logic


When I first heard about the Aero Strippers a few years ago, my initial reaction was that it was just a fad that would pass. Well I am now well and truly eating humble pie as the Aero Strippers have become an integral part of all batsman’s protective kit collection.

A few years on and the Aero strippers range has remained pretty much the same, but in terms of sales has gone from strength to strength.

However, if I’m perfectly honest to this day I still don’t understand why hoardes of junior and senior batsmen feel this piece of kit is so important and perhaps my reasoning to follow will make some sense.

The cricket helmet protects the all important head area and brands like Gray-Nicolls and GM produce very good quality helmets from around the £40 mark. Next up in order of importance is the batting legguard. Without this vital piece of equipment there are surely going to be some broken bones from the pacier deliveries.

Very often customers will come in stating that they don’t really want to pay more than £35-£40 for a batting legguard and then no more than £25 for a pair of batting gloves.

I sincerely respect all of the above statements but then what really throws me back is when that same customer wants to spend £40 on Aero Strippers.

Don’t get me wrong, the Aero strippers range contains some brilliantly made products. They offer a great quality, fantastic protection and do exactly what they are supposed to. However how can anyone justify wanting to spend more on a thigh and inner thigh pad than they would on a pair of batting legguards?

If you get hit on the legs and are not wearing a decent pair of pads, you will do some serious damage to your knee, shins and ankle areas to name just a few. However even if you’re not wearing a thigh pad altogether let alone a cheap one and you get hit on the thigh you will end up with some bruising.

Hence, my utter dismay at the budget allocations many customers seem to think it’s sensible to come down for the  essential pieces of protective equipment they need.

If you are willing to spend £40 on the thigh area then common sense says should be spending more than that on your batting legguards. There is more to injure around your lower leg area than there is around the thigh and inner thigh areas.

Likewise with batting gloves too we very often hear the comment of not wanting to spend too much money as “I’m not good batsmen anyways”. In my opinion commonsense says if you are not so great a batsmen, it means you’re more likely to get hit on the gloves and therefore you should be spending more on them.

A good batsmen is more likely to have the agility to play the ball with his bat than one that is not so great and may well get wrapped on the knuckles and therefore rather more prone to injury.

The Aero Strippers range offers great quality at a good price, but likewise don’t forget how important other items of protective equipment are too.

Masuri Original Series Cricket Helmets


Masuri cricket helmets, I guess you could say are like the Coca Cola of the cricketing helmet world. Whilst they are simply one of many brands available, they are also one of the 1st you think of when it comes to cricket helmets.

After the new safety standards were introduced a few years ago, all the leading brands had to go back to the drawing board and reinvent themselves. Masuri did that with the vision series, but there were some that still wanted the age old infamous original design.

Masuri Original Series styling features includes…

  • A cloth covered top with great all round visibility.
  • Titanium and Steel grill variations.
  • Padding all around the inside of the helmet to ensure the batsmen maximum comfort at the crease.

In terms of quality and workmanship, we can safely say the Masuri helmet is amongst the best thanks to their in-house production facility in the UK.

Your cricket equipment original kit bag is certainly complete with one of the Masuri helmets which are available with other size variations as well as steel and titanium options.

Let’s have a closer look on the Masuri Original Series MK2 Cricket Helmet:

Shrey Cricket Helmets

Shrey cricket helmets came onto the scene just a few years ago and have quickly become one of the most recognisable brands amongst the worlds top international players.

Originally trading as a manufacturing unit for one of the worlds best selling cricket helmet brands, Shrey cricket helmets have since established themselves as an own brand manufacturer with the added bonus of producing their own product and therefore having full control over styling, quality and efficient distribution.

Although used by the world’s best, Shrey have planned their marketing and range really well and as a result cater to all price points.

They start off with the Armor range where a junior helmet costs less than £40 and then go all the way up to the Masterclass Air Titanium which includes a neck guard for free.

All the helmets in the Shrey range conform to the latest BS 2013 safety standards. This standard is now being forced to a greater degree by the cricketing hierarchy in the UK, so as to try and ensure the safety of both junior and senior players in the game.

The added safety features of all helmets that conform to the standards insures a stronger Peak area, better quality Grills then were previously made on helmets, as well as the fixed grill position which insures the ball cannot breach the gap between the grill and helmet peak.

The Shrey range of helmets are known for their lightweight and sleek designs and with the added models that have been introduced for the new season, the lower price points are certainly going to appeal to a wider range of cricketers.

For details on the Shrey helmets can be found at the old vks.com

How to choose batting pads


Selecting a good pair of batting pads is an important decision, primarily because they tend to last longer than any other piece of kit and therefore will be with you for the longest period of time. Get it wrong and you could be looking at a mistake for many years.

First of all, batting pads will usually come in left and right handed models. An alternative to this would be an ambidextrous pair that can be worn by both right and left handed players. It shouldn’t be too complicated, as both the right and left and models as well as the ambidextrous models will offer you the correct amount of side bolster protection.

With regards to size, your knee should align with the centre part of the knee section to the back of the batting legguards.

In terms of adults sizes, there is the small men’s size which suits players around 5ft 5″ to  5ft 8″, we then have the men size which is suitable for players around 5ft 9″ to 6ft and then the large men’s size is for players taller than 6ft.

For juniors the sizes offered can vary from brand to brand. Some can classify them as Boys and Youths, whereas others have Junior and Junior Large.

In the VKS range we carry a large range of sizes starting from Ultra Mini for the youngest of players through to a new size we created called Large Boys. This Large Boys size is just smaller than the Youth/Small Men’s size and has been extremely popular as it bridges a gap in the size range.

In respect to the different styles and designs of batting Legguards, we could start by simplifying them into 3 categories, namely traditional, modern and moulded.

The traditional design pads are the ones which have the 7 to 8 slim bars running vertically down the front of the pad. Very often the front bars have cane inserts which add protection to the front of the pad. Those that don’t have the cane inserts will still offer top quality protection thanks to the high density foam inserts pleased within the bars and will also reduce the weight.

The modern design pad have large single section panels to the front and the side and are usually complimented by a few vertical bars which break up the design of the larger panels. These pads tend to be lightweight and flexible when worn.

The moulded design pads are similar to the ones one by Sachin Tendulkar. They are extremely lightweight but also rather rigid and not very flexible. They certainly don’t suit all batsmen and despite being used by some many popular mainstream players have never really taken off due to their limiting feel.

Getting the correct size of batting pads is very important, especially for junior players. A pad that is too large, will very often hinder a batsmens running and therefore severely restrict them when trying to take single runs between the wicket.

A lot of emphasis nowadays is being placed upon the weight of batting legguards. Whilst this may seem important, once they are on a few grams here and there is it really going to make too much of a difference. After all you must take into account you don’t really measure the weight of your trousers and socks and those two are been worn in the same way as your pads.

In terms of price, you can expect to pay anywhere from £25 for a junior pad up to over £100 for a senior model, with lots of different price points in between offering excellent quality and value for money.

We at the VKS have a large number of pads and catering to all price points and with some extremely light models too, possibly some of the lightest on the market.

Shrey Cricket Helmets

The new safety standards for cricket helmets has seen the introduction of newly designed models from top companies like Masuri, GM, Gray a nicolls and Shrey.

Although many may not have heard of this new company, Shreyhave many years of experience in producing top quality helmets that have been used by international stars all over the world.

The all new Air range includes both a steel and superlight titanium version that is currently being worn by numerous stars in the IPL. The rigid peak, fixed grill design and lightweight feel have made this an extremely popular helmet during its first few weeks of sale in the UK.

Priced at £79.99 for the titanium and £144.99 for the titanium these helmets are available in 3 senior sizes ranging from small men’s to large men’s.

Check our online store for wide range of Shrey cricket helmets

Masuri Stem Guard

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Masuri have just announced the release date for the much awaited Stem Guard.

Available from August the guard will offer unrivalled protection to the batsmen and will be available for all helmets in the Vision Series.

Available for £49.99, watch our website for more updates.

Check our online store for wide range of Masuri cricket helmets & stem guards